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2004 - 2007

2004 - 2007

Highlights of Gigs, Events & Productions

2008 - 2010

2008 - 2010

Highlights of Gigs, Events & Productions

2015 - 2017

2015 - 2017

Highlights of Gigs, Events & Productions

Chauka Calling

Chauka Calling

Presented at:​
​
The South Pacific Beauty Pageant in Suva, Fiji 2009
Climate Change - Melanesian Night

Pacific Storms in Brisbane, 2009

Pasifika Festival in Auckland, March 2010

"The water used to be 15 metres from Chachu's door, now it's only 4 metres away" The sea at Mata'an (the eye of the water) Beach in Loniu, Manus Islands (PNG) is rising.
Sunameke Productions debuted "Chauka Calling" at the 2009 Miss South Pacific Pageant in Suva, Fiji. The performance was televised across the Pacific to an audience of 6 million people. "Chauka Calling" was created to raise awareness of climate change and it's effects in Oceania. Using traditional stories, dances and songs from across Oceania in a contemporary context; Sunameke illustrated the links between pacific islanders and the sea and highlighted the future adversity that awaits them in the form of climate change.

The legend of "Leveyam" tells the story of a young man and his new wife, whom the Chauka, the gaurdian bird of the village discovers is a masalai or spirit. The Chauka bird warns the villagers of the imminent danger Leveyam's wife represents, and in response the villagers take to their canoes and leave their village behind to start new lives. "Leveyam" was the inspiration for "Chauka Calling" as the Chauka warned the villagers of a threat, Sunameke uses the symbol of the Chauka to warn the world of the danger our Pacific Islands are now facing.
Heed the call of the Chauka and plan and act for the future.

Nesian Pride

Nesian Pride

Nesian Pride has been a part of Sunameke’s history since 2005. With an aim to showcase the true multicultural nature of Darwin’s Pacific performing community, the first Nesian Pride production laid the foundations for the evolved and more dynamic shows Sunameke presented in 2012 and 2013.


Found Words

Found Words

Julia Mage’au of Sunameke presented her solo work 'Found Words', making comment on the discoveries of sleeping knowledge in museums and libraries and the constant pressure to own and balance the knowledge that comes with their awakening. With the poetry of the late Teresia Teaiwa, Costume design by Dru Douglas from Lumai, Sunameke short film and dance by Julia, 'Found Words' is an expression of connection and disconnection to the past and the present of our Pacific heritage.

Images from the sunameke short clips presented in 'Found Words' (Defining Pasifika | Identify Me | Bag Lady | Preserve Me | This Book)

A'inaisa at APT8

A'inaisa at APT8

As part of the APT8 opening 'Live' performances at QAGOMA, Sunameke presented A'inaisa.

A'inaisa was a response to our Pasifika cultures being censored by a dominant cultural perspective.
Our cultural arts practices often being censored and deemed inappropriate for the public.

Dear Aunty

Dear Aunty

With Tattoo, Dogs teeth, Gowns, Coconut oil and Torch light.
How do Hapakasi, Afakasi, Afa, Mixed Race Islanders manage many worlds?

Sunameke gathers its stories for Dear Aunty from surveys sent out through facebook and YouTube and brings it together in dance and music.
These tales of acceptance are delivered with a soft punch and a wicked smile..
Its an intimate perspective on what it is to be mixed race living in Australia. From the Islands to Aussie within our own bodies we find the balance. Confronting and beautiful this show is just like its namesake. Highly versatile we transform from supermodels to thieves and all the while we tell you about her.

A sneak peek into the lives of the Hapakasi!

Who Born You

Who Born You

Who Born You recounts the personal Kokoda Trail adventures of mixed-race modern women. Women born from Indigenous cultures impacted upon by Christian Missionaries and Western Lifestyle. ​
It impels audiences to question depictions of Pacific women as not unlike traditional idols now seen as objects of art in a museum or gallery.​
Intimate and thought provoking, it challenges the stereotype of the Pacific Woman with flowers in her hair and a beckoning smile. ​
Delving into the contemporary world of rhythmic hips, shoe boxes, shared space and
grounded feet. ​
Who Born You will rock your heart and weave the tracks of the modern day Pacific Woman.​